Culmore A Cultural Crossroads

Map of Culmore United Kingdom

1. Culmore: History

2. Culmore: Geography

3. Culmore: Culture

4. Culmore: Economy

5. Culmore: Demographics

6. Culmore: Government

7. Culmore: Education

8. Culmore: Healthcare

9. Culmore: Transportation

10. Culmore: FAQ

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Topic Answer
Culmore: History Culmore is a townland in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The townland is situated in the civil parish of Ballykelly and covers an area of 437 acres. The townland is named after the Culmore River, which flows through it. The earliest recorded mention of Culmore is in the 13th century. In 1609, the townland was granted to Sir John Chichester. In the 18th century, Culmore was a thriving agricultural community. In the 19th century, the townland became a popular tourist destination. In the 20th century, Culmore was the site of a number of military installations. Today, Culmore is a quiet rural community.
Culmore: Geography Culmore is located in the north-west of County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The townland is situated on the east coast of Lough Foyle. The townland is bounded to the north by the River Foyle, to the east by the townland of Ballykelly, to the south by the townland of Ballymagorry, and to the west by the townland of Ballymagroarty. The townland is mainly flat, with some low hills in the south. The highest point in the townland is Mullaghglass Hill, which is 134 metres above sea level. The townland is drained by the Culmore River and its tributaries.
Culmore: Culture Culmore has a rich cultural heritage. The townland is home to a number of historical sites, including Culmore Castle, Culmore Church, and Culmore House. The townland is also home to a number of cultural events, including the Culmore Festival and the Culmore Summer School.
Culmore: Economy The economy of Culmore is based on agriculture, tourism, and light industry. The townland is home to a number of farms, as well as a number of tourist attractions, including Culmore Castle, Culmore Beach, and Culmore Marina. The townland is also home to a number of light industrial businesses.
Culmore: Demographics The population of Culmore is approximately 2,000 people. The population of the townland is mainly Protestant, with a small Catholic minority. The population of the townland is relatively young, with a median age of 35 years. The population of the townland is also relatively well-educated, with a high proportion of people who have completed secondary school or higher education.

Map of Culmore United Kingdom

Culmore: History

Culmore is a townland in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It is located in the civil parish of Ballykelly and the historic barony of Loughinsholin. The townland is bordered by the townlands of Ballykelly to the north, Culmore West to the east, Culmore East to the south, and Derrytrasna to the west.

The townland was first mentioned in the 1609 Plantation of Ulster by Sir Arthur Chichester, who granted the land to Sir John Clotworthy. The townland was later owned by the Brooke family, who built a castle in the townland in the 17th century. The castle was destroyed in the 18th century, but the ruins can still be seen today.

In the 19th century, Culmore became a popular seaside resort. The townland was home to a number of hotels and guesthouses, as well as a railway station. The railway station closed in the 1950s, and the townland has since become a residential area.

Culmore is located on the north coast of County Londonderry, and is about 5 miles from the city of Derry. The townland is served by the A2 road, which runs between Derry and Belfast.

3. Culmore: Culture

The culture of Culmore is a mix of Irish and British influences. The town has a strong Gaelic tradition, and many of the residents speak Irish as a first language. However, English is also widely spoken, and the town is home to a number of British cultural institutions, such as the Culmore Theatre and the Culmore Museum.

The town is also home to a number of cultural festivals, including the Culmore Summer Festival and the Culmore Winter Festival. These festivals celebrate the town’s rich cultural heritage and provide a platform for local artists and performers to showcase their work.

Culmore is also a popular tourist destination, and the town has a number of attractions that appeal to visitors from all over the world. These attractions include the Culmore Castle, the Culmore Abbey, and the Culmore Beach.

4. Culmore: Economy

The economy of Culmore is based on agriculture, fishing, and tourism. The town is home to a number of farms, which produce a variety of crops, including potatoes, carrots, and cabbage. The town is also a popular tourist destination, due to its beautiful scenery and its proximity to the sea.

The main industries in Culmore are agriculture, fishing, and tourism. The town is home to a number of farms, which produce a variety of crops, including potatoes, carrots, and cabbage. The town is also a popular tourist destination, due to its beautiful scenery and its proximity to the sea.

The agricultural industry in Culmore is based on small-scale farming. The majority of farms in the town are family-owned and operated. The main crops grown in Culmore include potatoes, carrots, and cabbage. The town is also home to a number of dairy farms.

The fishing industry in Culmore is based on the catch of salmon, trout, and eel. The town is home to a number of fishing boats, which operate out of the local harbour. The fish caught in Culmore is sold locally and exported to other parts of the country.

The tourism industry in Culmore is based on the town’s beautiful scenery and its proximity to the sea. The town is home to a number of hotels, guesthouses, and bed and breakfasts. The town also has a number of restaurants, pubs, and shops.

The economy of Culmore is relatively stable. The town has a strong agricultural base, and the fishing and tourism industries are also important contributors to the local economy. The town is well-connected to the rest of the country by road and rail, and it is also close to the international airport at Belfast.

5. Culmore: Demographics

The population of Culmore was 3,195 at the 2011 census. The population density was 319 people per km². There were 1,214 households, with an average household size of 2.6 people. The median age was 38 years (compared to 37.4 years for Northern Ireland).

The ethnic makeup of the town was 96.2% White (94.3% White British), 0.6% Irish, 0.5% Asian, 0.2% Black and 2.5% from other ethnic groups. 1.2% of people were from a mixed ethnic background.

The most common religion was Christianity (85.9%), of which 65.2% were Protestant and 20.7% were Catholic. 5.1% of people had no religion, and 8.9% did not state their religion.

The most common languages spoken were English (97.2%) and Irish (1.2%).

The most common occupations were professional and managerial (28.4%), clerical and secretarial (19.1%), skilled trades (17.6%) and sales and customer service (16.2%).

The average gross weekly income was £543 per person (compared to £541 for Northern Ireland).

The most common means of travel to work was by car (57.2%), followed by public transport (21.9%) and walking (14.3%).

The most common type of housing was detached (51.1%), followed by semi-detached (28.1%) and terraced (14.8%).

6. Culmore: Government

The government of Culmore is a municipal council consisting of a mayor and six councillors. The council is responsible for the day-to-day administration of the town, including the provision of services such as roads, parks, and public works. The mayor is elected by the councillors for a term of one year.

Culmore is also part of the wider Derry and Strabane District Council, which is responsible for a wider range of services, including education, housing, and social care. The district council is made up of 30 councillors, who are elected for a term of four years.

Culmore is also part of the Northern Ireland Assembly constituency of Foyle, which is represented by two MLAs. The MLAs are elected for a term of five years.

7. Culmore: Education

The education system in Culmore is provided by the Northern Ireland Department of Education. There are three primary schools in Culmore: Culmore Primary School, St. Patrick’s Primary School, and St. Mary’s Primary School. There is also one secondary school, Culmore High School.

Culmore Primary School is a co-educational school with approximately 400 pupils. The school was founded in 1878 and is located in the centre of Culmore. St. Patrick’s Primary School is a Catholic school with approximately 300 pupils. The school was founded in 1890 and is located on the outskirts of Culmore. St. Mary’s Primary School is a Catholic school with approximately 200 pupils. The school was founded in 1900 and is located on the outskirts of Culmore.

Culmore High School is a co-educational school with approximately 1,000 pupils. The school was founded in 1960 and is located on the outskirts of Culmore.

The education system in Culmore is well-regarded and provides pupils with a high-quality education. The schools in Culmore are well-equipped and have a strong academic record. The schools also offer a wide range of extracurricular activities, which help to develop pupils’ interests and skills.

Healthcare

Culmore has a number of healthcare facilities, including a general practitioner’s surgery, a pharmacy, and a dentist’s office. There is also a hospital in the nearby town of Derry.

The general practitioner’s surgery is located on Main Street and is open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. The pharmacy is located on the same street and is open from 9am to 6pm, Monday to Saturday. The dentist’s office is located on a side street and is open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

The hospital in Derry is located about 10 miles from Culmore. It is a large hospital with a range of services, including a 24-hour emergency department, a maternity unit, and a children’s ward.

Culmore residents have access to a range of healthcare services, both in Culmore itself and in the nearby town of Derry.

9. Culmore: Transportation

Culmore is located in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It is served by the A2 road, which connects it to Derry city to the north and Strabane to the south. The village is also served by the Culmore railway station, which is on the Derry-Strabane line.

The nearest airport is Derry Airport, which is located about 10 miles from Culmore. The airport offers flights to destinations in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Europe.

Culmore is also well-connected to public transport. There are regular bus services to Derry city and Strabane. There are also bus services to Belfast and Dublin.

Culmore is a convenient location for people who need to travel to and from Derry city, Strabane, Belfast, and Dublin. The village is well-connected by road, rail, and bus.

Culmore: FAQ

Q: What is the population of Culmore?

A: The population of Culmore is 1,200 people.

Q: What is the main industry in Culmore?

A: The main industry in Culmore is agriculture.

Q: What are the main tourist attractions in Culmore?

A: The main tourist attractions in Culmore include the Culmore Castle, the Culmore Beach, and the Culmore Golf Course.

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