SOTTO SOTTO RISTORANTE MAP & ADDRESS & PHONE TORONTO

116 Avenue Rd, Toronto, 416-962-0011

www.sottosotto.ca

CUISINE: Italian

DRINKS: Full Bar

SERVING: Lunch & Dinner

PRICE RANGE: $$$$

NEIGHBORHOOD: The Annex

This upscale restaurant offers a romantic atmosphere and a menu of traditional Italian fare. Menu favorites include: Capellini Nazini (Angel hair pasta) and Papparoelle dei castelli (egg noodles with mushrooms).

SOTTO SOTTO RISTORANTE MAP & ADDRESS & PHONE TORONTO Photo Gallery



This has made it particularly dangerous to shipping and it would have been a virtually impossible task to attempt to navigate vessels around the submerged shoals under sail. Bearing witness to this fact are the bits and pieces of wreckage, including anchors, chains, large brass rudder pintles and heavy planking full of copper pins, which can be found everywhere under the kelp beds and reefs on the seabed. Unfortunately, as would also be expected, the wrecks inshore are literally smashed to smithereens, so the chances are slim for modern day scuba divers who live in hope of finding a decent wrecksite. During the age of sail there were many dozens of ships lost on the seaward side of the island. Here is just a sample of those unfortunate casualties: The 131-ton brig Falcon was transporting a cargo of wheat when she foundered off Emmanuel Head in October 1851; she was caught out in a Force 10 nor’easterly storm and driven inshore, where her crew of eight perished in the pounding surf. In October 1852, a vessel called Elliott was wrecked and her crew of six all perished. In February 1853 the 46-ton sloop Janet Johnson was carrying a cargo of wheat when she stranded on the rocks in a Force 10 nor’easterly storm and her two-man crew were drowned Just to the south of Holy Island harbour, in January 1854, the 82-ton British schooner Lancaster was driven onto the shoals, where she stranded during a Force 10 east-south-easterly storm. One of her crew of five was drowned but the vessel was partially salvaged along with the general cargo. In 1860, a 415-ton wooden barque, loaded with coal, stranded and was totally wrecked during a Force 7 east-south-easterly gale. She was driven onto the treacherous reefs close to Emmanuel Head and one of her crew of 16 was drowned.

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