Idaho Map

Boise Art Museum- At this Boise, Idaho art museum see some of the 3,000 works of its permanent collection, including European and Asian art. The museum’s collections give focus to art of the Northwest as well as American Realism and ceramics.

Fort Hall Replica- This Pocatello, Idaho fort- located on the famed Oregon Trail- gives visitors a feel for what it would have been like to stop here while traversing the challenging trail.

Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology: This Boise Museum provides free admission and houses a variety of rocks, minerals, fossils, and artifacts. The seismic station tracks earthquake activity around the world.

Near to the southern edge of the drop-off, long strands of tangleweed wave frantically in the current once the tide starts to run, and if you don’t want to dive when the water is boiling on the surface, this is the time to leave the area.

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On the ebb tide, the current sweeps along the reef wall in a northerly direction and it is literally impossible to get over and down the wall when it is running hard.

The reef top is at four metres, with vertical drop-offs and giant monolith-type pillars rising like skyscrapers from the seabed at 24 metres. These are covered in a wealth of beautiful anemones, including Devonshire cup corals, jewel anemones, soft corals and peculiar, colourful little Hydroids, for those who look closely enough. Swirling shoals of coley and pollack hover near to the reef tops and on a good day, when the visibility is at its best, the scenery is magnificent.

This is a really superb dive and one not to be missed. After diving in a great many places around the coast of Britain, including fabulous sites around the Isle of Lewis and Benbecula in the Outer Hebrides, my colleagues and I believe that this is one of the best dive sites – if not the best – anywhere. There are canyons full of wreckage, including everything that comes off a ship.

Even if most of it is covered by or buried in piles of concretion and steel girders, it is all still there, just waiting to be recovered: pipes, masts, anchors, anodes, chain, winches, portholes, bits of pressure clocks, bronze valves and, somewhere under it all, will be the ship’s bells and telegraphs. There are submarine cliffs alive with colourful life, along with the usual crustaceans and fish.

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