KUNST HAUS WIEN

KUNST HAUS WIEN

Artist-environmentalist Friedenreich Hundertwasser built this museum without straight lines even the floor bends. In addition to his work, it hosts contemporary art from around the world. (Ill, Untere WeiBgerberstr. 13. ill or 4 to Schwedenpl. then tram N to Hetzg. Open daily 10am-7pm. ‚8, students ‚6; M half-price.)

KUNST HAUS WIEN Photo Gallery



The ship’s master quickly turned and made off at full speed as soon as he realised it was an enemy boat. The submarine was in fact the KDM U-boat SM UB19, commanded by Kapitanleutnant Walter Gustav Becker of the Flandern Flotilla. UB 19 immediately opened fire with its deck gun and the fourth shell struck the ship’s bridge. The steamer was then brought to a halt and her crew of 30 abandoned ship, but as they did so, the submarine approached one of the boats and captured its crew. Seven of the crew, including the master, were forced to accompany two German sailors back onboard the San Bernardo and the Germans placed explosive charges below her decks while the seven men were allowed to collect personal valuables and some food. All the men returned to the lifeboat and got clear of the ship before the explosives went off, but only two of them detonated. The U-boat commander questioned the men before allowing them to proceed on their way. They rowed in a westerly direction for a while before the 154-ton steam trawler Magnus (1896) picked them up at 0330 hrs on 11 August and landed them at North Shields quay at 0930 hrs. The San Bernardo, which had been in ballast and en route from Tyssedal, Norway to South Shields, sank about 17 miles SE of the Longstone. ADM 137/2960; Starke/Schell; LCWLR 1914-1918, p. 52; BVLS 1914-1918, p. 21; BMS 1914-1918, p. 71; LR 1915-1916, no.43 (B) and no.137 (S) Supplement. The John G. Watson (Official No. 137384) was a 235-ton steam trawler measuring 37.33 m in length, with a 6.75-m beam and a 3. 73-m draught. Hall, Russell and Sons Ltd at Aberdeen built and completed her as Yard No. 588 in September 1916; she was launched on 30 August 1916 for Richard Irvin and Sons Ltd at North Shields, who also owned her at the time of loss. Port reg: SN.305. The single steel screw was powered by a 78-rhp, three-cylinder triple expansion steam engine that used one single-ended boiler. The cylinders measured 30.38 cm, 50.8 cm and 86.36 cm with a 60.

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