Lisbon Map Tourist Attractions

And whereas by an act passed in the third year of Lisbon Map Tourist Attractions the reign of his late majesty King George the First, intituled, And act for redeeming the Lisbon Map Tourist Attractions duties and revenues which were settled to pay off principal and interest on the orders made forth at four lottery acts passed in the ninth and tenth years of her late Majesty’s reign; and for redeeming certain annuities payable on orders out of the hereditary excise, according to a former act in that behalf; and for establishing a general yearly fund, not only for the future payment of annuities at several rates, to be payable and transferrable at the bank of England, and redeemable by parliament, but also to raise monies for such proprietors of the said orders as shall choose to be paid their principal and arrears of interest in ready money; and for making good such other deficiencies and payments as in this act are mentioned; and for taking off the duties on linseed imported, and British linen exported; the said several rates and duties are made perpetual: And whereas by an act of parliament made in the twelfth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An act for laying additional duties on sope and paper; and upon certain linens, silks, callicoes, and stuffs; and upon starch, and exported coals; and upon stampt vellum, parchment, and paper, for raising one million four hundred thousand pounds, by way of a lottery, for her Majesty’s supply; and for allowances on exporting made wares of leather, sheep skins, and lamb skins; and for distribution of four thousand pounds due to the officers and seamen for gun money; and to adjust the property of tickets in former lotteries; and touching certain shares of stock in the capital of the South Sea company; and for appropriating the monies granted to her Majesty; it is, amongst other things, enacted.

That there should be raised, levied, collected, and paid, to and for the use of her Majesty, her heirs, and successors, for and upon all silks, callicoes, linens, and stuffs, of what kind soever, which, at any time or times within or during the term of thirty two years, to be reckoned from the second day of August, one thousand seven hundred and fourteen, should be printed, stained, painted, or dyed, in Great Britain such callicoes, linens, and fustians, as shall be dyed throughout of one colour only; and stuffs made of woollen, or whereof the greatest parts in value shall be woollen; always excepted the several and respective rates and duties therein and herein after expressed over and above all other duties payable for the same, or any of them that is to say, For and upon all silks so printed, stained, or painted, within or during the term aforesaid, in Great Britain silk handkerchiefs excepted the sum of six pence for every yard in length, reckoning half a yard for the breadth. And for all silk handkerchiefs so printed, stained, or painted, within or during the term aforesaid, in Great Britain, the sum of one penny for every yard square; and in those proportions for wider or narrower silks. And whereas by an act of parliament made in the sixth year of the reign of his said late majesty King George the First, intituled, An act for enabling the South Sea company to encrease their present capital and fund, by redeeming such publick debts and incumbrances as are therein mentioned; and for raising money, to be applied for lessening several of the publick debts and incumbrances; and for calling in the present exchequer bills remaining uncancelled; and for making forth new bills in lieu thereof, to be circulated and exchanged upon demand at or near the exchequer; the said several rates and duties last mentioned are made perpetual: And whereas some doubts have arisen, whether ribbands and silks so printed, stained, or painted, being less than half a yard in breadth, are within the meaning of the said recited acts, and liable to the said several rates and duties by the said acts imposed: Now, for obviating all such doubts, be it declared by the authority aforesaid, That all ribbands and silks printed, stained, or painted, in Great Britain, though less than half a yard in breadth, are, within the true intent and meaning of the said acts, liable to the several rates and duties by the said two first mentioned acts imposed, according to the proportions in which such ribbands or silks are or shall be made. VII. And whereas by an act made in this present session of parliament, intituled, An act for allowing the free importation of rice, sago powder, and vermicelli, into this kingdom, from his Majesty’s colonies in North Country, for a limited time, it is, amongst other things, enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for any person or persons to import into Great Britain, from any of his Majesty’s colonies in North Country, at any time or times before the first day of December, one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, any rice, without the payment of any subsidy, custom, duty, or imposition whatsoever: Now, to the end the advantage intended to this kingdom, by the said recited act, may not be evaded by the exportation of such rice into foreign parts; we your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects the commons of Great Britain, in parliament assembled, do give and grant unto your Majesty, and do humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted; and be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That for and upon all rice which hath been or shall be, imported into this kingdom duty-free, by virtue of the said recited act, and which shall be again exported thereout, there shall be paid and answered to his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, a subsidy of poundage of six pence in the pound, according to the value or rate set upon rice imported, in the book of rates referred to by the act of the twelfth year of King Charles the Second; which said subsidy of six pence in the pound upon such rice so exported, shall be raised, levied, collected, and recovered, by such ways and means, and under such rules, regulations, penalties, and forfeitures, as the subsidy or poundage for any goods or merchandizes exported from Great Britain may be raised, levied, collected, or recovered, by any act of parliament now in force, as fully and effectually, to all intents and purposes, as if the several clauses, powers, directions, penalties, and forfeitures, relating thereto, were particularly repeated and again enacted into the body of this present act. VIII.

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