Stonewall A Southern Town with a Rich History

Map of Stonewall United States

I. Introduction

II. History of Stonewall

III. Demographics of Stonewall

IV. Geography of Stonewall

V. Economy of Stonewall

VI. Culture of Stonewall

VII. Education in Stonewall

VIII. Notable people from Stonewall

IX. Places of interest in Stonewall

X. FAQ

Feature Description
Map of Stonewall, United States A map of the town of Stonewall in the U.S. state of Texas.
Stonewall, United States The town of Stonewall in the U.S. state of Texas.
Stonewall, NY The town of Stonewall in the U.S. state of New York.
Stonewall National Monument A national monument in the U.S. state of New York dedicated to the memory of the Stonewall uprising.
Stonewall uprising A series of riots that took place in June 1969 at the Stonewall Inn in New York City, which are widely considered to be the start of the modern gay rights movement.

Map of Stonewall United States

II. History of Stonewall

The town of Stonewall was founded in 1881 by a group of settlers from the state of Tennessee. The town was named after Stonewall Jackson, a Confederate general who was killed during the American Civil War. Stonewall grew slowly over the years, and by the early 20th century it had a population of around 500 people. The town’s economy was based on agriculture and ranching.

In the 1930s, Stonewall was hit hard by the Great Depression. The town’s population declined, and many businesses closed. However, the town began to recover in the 1940s, and by the 1950s it had a population of around 1,000 people.

In the 1960s, Stonewall was the site of a number of civil rights protests. The town was home to a segregated school system, and black students were denied access to the same educational opportunities as white students. In 1964, a group of black students from Stonewall High School organized a sit-in at the local segregated lunch counter. The sit-in lasted for several days, and eventually the lunch counter was desegregated.

In the 1970s, Stonewall continued to grow. The town’s population reached 2,000 people, and the town’s economy diversified. The town’s economy is now based on a variety of businesses, including agriculture, ranching, tourism, and manufacturing.

In the 1980s, Stonewall was hit hard by the oil bust. The town’s economy suffered, and many businesses closed. However, the town began to recover in the 1990s, and by the 2000s it had a population of around 3,000 people.

Today, Stonewall is a thriving community. The town’s population is around 4,000 people, and the town’s economy is based on a variety of businesses. Stonewall is a popular tourist destination, and the town is home to a number of historical sites and museums.

III. Demographics of Stonewall

The population of Stonewall was 1,001 at the 2010 census. The racial makeup of Stonewall was 86.3% White, 1.5% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 10.0% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.5% of the population.

The median household income was $31,806, and the median family income was $40,417. Males had a median income of $25,417 versus $19,583 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,408. About 14.0% of families and 18.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under age 18 and 15.4% of those age 65 or over.

Map of Stonewall United States

IV. Geography of Stonewall

Stonewall is located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Texas. It is situated in Stonewall County, and is the county seat. The town is located along U.S. Route 84, and is approximately 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Austin. Stonewall has a population of approximately 1,300 people.

The town is situated in a rural area, and is surrounded by farmland. The climate is semi-arid, with hot summers and mild winters. The town is located in the Edwards Plateau region, and is at an elevation of approximately 1,200 feet (370 m) above sea level.

The town is served by the Stonewall Independent School District. There are two schools in the district: Stonewall Elementary School and Stonewall High School. The town also has a public library, a fire department, and a police department.

V. Economy of Stonewall

The economy of Stonewall is based primarily on agriculture and tourism. The town is located in a fertile farming region, and many of its residents are employed in the production of crops such as cotton, corn, and soybeans. Stonewall is also a popular tourist destination, thanks to its beautiful scenery and its rich history. The town is home to a number of historical sites, including the Stonewall National Monument, which commemorates the Stonewall Uprising of 1969. The Stonewall Uprising is considered to be a major turning point in the history of the LGBTQ+ rights movement.

VI. Culture of Stonewall

The culture of Stonewall is a blend of Texan and Mexican cultures. The town is home to a number of festivals and events that celebrate both cultures, including the Stonewall Mexican Fiesta and the Stonewall Watermelon Festival. The town is also home to a number of museums and historical sites, including the Stonewall Historical Museum and the Stonewall County Courthouse.

VII. Education in Stonewall

The town of Stonewall is served by the Stonewall Independent School District. The district has one elementary school, one middle school, and one high school. The elementary school has a student population of approximately 400 students, the middle school has a student population of approximately 300 students, and the high school has a student population of approximately 500 students. The district also offers a variety of extracurricular activities, including sports, clubs, and student government.

Notable people from Stonewall

The following is a list of notable people from Stonewall, Texas:

* J. Frank Dobie (1888-1964), folklorist and author
* Pat Neff (1871-1952), Governor of Texas (1921-1925)
* Jack St. Clair (1910-1979), football player
* Ricky Hatch (born 1978), football player
* Randy White (born 1960), football player
* Donna Walters (born 1946), actress
* Michael Hutcherson (born 1986), actor

IX. Places of interest in Stonewall

Stonewall is home to a variety of attractions, including:

* The Stonewall National Monument, which commemorates the Stonewall Uprising of 1969, a turning point in the gay rights movement.
* The Stonewall Inn, a gay bar that was the site of the Stonewall Uprising.
* The Morris-Butler House, a historic home that is now a museum.
* The Stonewall Cemetery, a historic cemetery that is home to the graves of many notable figures from Stonewall’s history.
* The Stonewall Arts Center, a community center that offers a variety of arts and cultural programs.
* The Stonewall Chamber of Commerce, a business organization that promotes Stonewall’s economy.
* The Stonewall School District, which provides education for students from pre-kindergarten through high school.

X. FAQ

Question 1: What is the difference between Stonewall, Texas and Stonewall, New York?

Answer 1: Stonewall, Texas is a town in Stonewall County, Texas, United States. Stonewall, New York is a town in Ulster County, New York, United States.

Question 2: What is the Stonewall National Monument?

Answer 2: The Stonewall National Monument is a United States national monument located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It commemorates the Stonewall Uprising, a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police raid that took place at the Stonewall Inn in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969.

Question 3: What is the Stonewall Uprising?

Answer 3: The Stonewall Uprising was a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police raid that took place at the Stonewall Inn in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969. The uprising is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement in the United States.

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