FOOD AND DRINK ON BELGIUM

FOOD AND DRINK ON BELGIUM

Belgian cuisine, a combination of French and German traditions, is praised throughout Western Europe, but an authentic evening meal may cost as much as that night’s accommodations. Seafood, fresh from the coast, is served in a variety of dishes. Moules or mosselen (steamed mussels), regarded as the national dish, are usually tasty and reasonably affordable (‚14 is the cheapest, usually ‚17-20). Often paired with mussels are frites (french fries), actually a Belgian invention, which they dip in mayonnaise and consume in abundance. Belgian beer is both a national pride and a national pastime; more varieties over 300, ranging from ordi nary Pilsners to religiously brewed Trappist ales are produced here than in any other country. Prices range from as little as ‚1 for regular or quirky blonde up to ‚3 for other varieties. Leave room for Belgian waffles {gaufres) soft, warm, glazed ones on the street (‚ 1.50) and thin, crispier ones piled high with toppings at cafes (‚2-5) and for the famous brands of chocolate, from Leonidas to Godiva.

HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS

Holidays: New Year’s Day (Jan. 1); Easter (Apr. 11); Easter Monday (Apr. 12); Labor Day (May 1); Ascension Day (May 20); Whit Sunday and Monday (May 30-31); Indepen dence Day (July 21); Assumption Day (Aug. 15); All Saints Day (Nov. 1); Armistice Day (Nov. 11); Christmas (Dec. 25).

Festivals: Ghent hosts the Gentse Feesten, also know as 10 Days Off (July 17-26). Wal- lonie hosts a slew of quirky and creative carnivals, including the Festival of Fairground Arts (late May), Les Jeux Nautiques (early Aug.), the International French-language Him Festival (early Sept.), and the International Bathtub Regatta (mid-Aug.).

FOOD AND DRINK ON BELGIUM Photo Gallery



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