Work In France

French people work at a wide range of jobs. Many work in offices, shops, or open-air markets. Others work in factories that produce machinery, metals, foods, and other products sold around the world. French airplanes and cars are especially important products.

A much smaller number of people still make a living off the land.

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Some work as farmers, growing wheat, sugar beets, grapes, potatoes, barley, apples, and other foods. Farmers also raise cattle, chickens, and pigs. Many foods are sold at local markets, and many are sold to other countries.

Pickers harvest and transport grapes to be made into wine in eastern France.

This dive is very similar to site, but it has the added bonus of having a wrecked steamship in its vicinity. As mentioned earlier, the wreck makes a wonderful photographer’s frame, especially when you catch the sun’s rays shining through the engine framework with the boiler in the background. On the flood tide, it is quite easy to swim where you want to over the cliff face and down around the bottom, although when you start to ascend and approach the reef top, the current whisks you away as if caught by a tornado. The best time to dive is about 20 minutes before low slack water on a neap tide. If the tide has started to run on the ebb, you will have difficulty in getting down the cliff faces because of the force of water pushing along and upwards. Once the tide begins to run, overfalls develop and the surface boils like a cauldron, with white water up to two metres high even on a calm day. It is also very unwise to anchor a small boat over the reef when the tide is in full flow. It is best to throw in a heavy shot attached to a large surface marker buoy with sufficient rope or cord, equal to about four times the depth of water, and then go and wait a little way downstream below the boil on the surface. It is also wise to have some form of quick release and a surface marker buoy on the end of the anchor line when the boat is at anchor, to save losing the divers because you cannot retrieve the anchor quickly enough. It sounds like common sense, but this happens on a regular basis.

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